Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference and Exhibition on Occupational Health & Safety Dallas, Texas, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Occupational Health-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jinky leilanie lu photo
Biography:

 

 
 


Jinky Leilanie LU holds a Master Degree of Occupational Health and PhD, and a Research Professor of the National Institutes of Health, University of the Philippines Manila with the Institute of Health Policy and Development Studies. She has authored two books, Gender, Information Technology, and Health which won the National Academy of Science and Technology book award in 2010, and reprinted by the University of Hawaii Press, 2007, and Basics of Occupational Health and Safety: Guidebook for Practitioners and Industries. She has produced 51 journal articles, and 28 of which are Science Citation Indexed. She also contributed a chapter in the Handbook of Anthropometry Physical Measures of Human Form in Health and Disease, published by Springer in 2012. Prof. Lu is a staunch advocate, both as an engaged academic and scientist, in promoting epidemiology of occupational health and safety. 

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem. Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important vegetable crop that is widely cultivated in the tropical and subtropical areas in Asia. Globally, the top three eggplant producers are China, India, and Egypt. The Philippines has been one of the top 10 eggplant-producing countries based on area planted and crop productivity. This study aims to describe the insecticide residues found in soil, water, and eggplant fruits in eggplant farms in Sta. Maria, Pangasinan.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The study design is a cross sectional of randomly selected eggplant farms in Sta. Maria, Pangasinan. Soil, water, and eggplant fruits were collected and subjected to gas chromatography analysis for multi-pesticide residues.

Findings. Farmers from Sta. Maria, Pangasinan were found to be applying a broad spectrum of insecticides on their eggplant crop. Soil samples from 11 (about 42%) out of the 26 farms tested positive for insecticide residues, six of which from four farms exceeded the acceptable maximum residue limit. These residues were profenofos, triazophos, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, and malathion. No insecticide residues were detected from water samples taken from the 26 farms. The farmers reported applying Prevathon and Malathion to control pests in their eggplant crops. The farmers and farm workers in the soil and water study reported experiencing itchiness of the skin (63.8%), redness of the eyes (29.3%), muscle pains (27.6%), and headaches (27.6%), as

being related to their pesticide exposure.  

Conclusion & Significance . In summary, a maximum of 20% of the eggplant samples tested positive for insecticide residues at any one stage of sampling done.

 

  • Agriculture health & Safety | Occupational Disease and Human Health| Occupational Women Health | Occupational Medicine and Therapy| Prevailing Issues in Occupational Health and Safety Occupational Hazards | Risk Assessment| Chronic Health, Industrial Food Safety and Management| Human factors and ergonomics |Occupational Health assistance
Location: Dallas
Speaker

Chair

Dr. Ilise L Feitshans

Executive Director The Work Health and Survival Project

Speaker

Co-Chair

Dr. Ruchi Girotra

President for Specialty Certified Medical Assistant

Speaker
Biography:

Aldila F Zulfah is a Master candidate of Occupational Health at the University of Birmingham. She was born and raised in Indonesia, yet at the age of 23, she decided to leave Indonesia for a while to pursue her education in the UK. She believes that her hard work by creating new ideas to improve the welfare of the people in Indonesia can make Indonesia become a much better country shortly. She and her friend for life, Fiqhi R Dengo, are currently building a first non-governmental organisation in Indonesia focusing on public health that is based on the principle of health and safety. Also, they are currently focused on publishing some of their scientific work in some conferences that have a theme of health and safety. They both have a big passion and pure love for Indonesia, and it will never fade.

Abstract:

Occupational diseases are the occupational health problem that receives serious concern in every industry sector, particularly in developing countries. However, in Indonesia, the lack of attention to health as well as the weakness of its prevention system make the occupational diseases often become a neglected problem. As a result, the data on health, work performance, and work-related diseases in the company became very minimal and improper to serve as a source of information. To improve it, Safe and Sound comes as a local network-based application that is user-friendly to record the health and work performance as measured by certain aspects. Each worker can access the Safe and Sound account using a personal access card to input daily health and performance records that include mental health conditions, physical conditions after work, and other forms of complaints. This database will be assessed each month to summarise the performance of workers in a graphic form and to categorise the workers into the vulnerable groups based on medical history and daily health reports. Also, it will shape the mindset of the company to promote the prevention system of occupational disease to improve the quality of working life (QWL). In the future, the amount of data on occupational diseases and work performance in developing countries such as Indonesia will increase, and the collection process will improve so that they will be able to overcome the complexity of occupational health problems. Other features such as online book the medical examination and mailing list will be available to ensure employee engage in every formulation of the program and decision-making process in the company. The secrecy of this database is highly secured and will only be accessible to the worker as well as the occupational health and safety practitioner that is responsible for the program.

Dr. Ilise L Feitshans

Executive Director The Work Health and Survival Project

Title: Occupational health Compliance programs promoting gender equity
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ilise L Feitshans JD and ScM and DIR

Guest researcher, National Centre for Research on the Work Environment, Copenhagen Denmark and

Legal Advisor The Greek National Platform on Nanomedicine

Citizen of Greece and the USA

Abstract:

Abigail Adams penned a letter to her husband, John Adams, in 1776. In the letter, written 95 days before John Adams signed the Declaration of Independence, Abigail urged her husband to “remember the ladies” when declaring independent suffrage for human beings lacking the divine right of kings. She wrote in her letter: “[…] in the new code of laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I desire you would remember the ladies and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors.”

Mrs. Adams First Lady when her husband was elected the 2nd President of the U.S. and was also the mother of John Quincy Adams, the 5th President of the U.S. She successfully ran the family farm while her husband was away, rising above the challenges of business, accomplishing child rearing and education, and combating their illness although she was not allowed to vote or own property min her lifetime

 The concept of gender equity is therefore  a old  conundrum as old as Our American Revolution, problem, but this problem  has garnered significant attention in recent decades, both in individual nations and under  international law.

Many of the concerns expressed by Mrs. Adams are still relevant in contemporary discussions of gender equity. International and U.S. regulations associated with gender equity have been in place for several decades, but implementation is  slow. This presentation examines some occupational safety and health (OSH) problems that have still not been resolved regarding the role of women in paid work: because  health at work impacts men and women differently and offers methods for implementing equitable occupational health programs nunder law, using due diligence and discrimination law as a guide. . This presentation examines  How safety professionals implement gender equity within our safety compliance programs that effectively comply with laws promoting womens rights.

Speaker
Biography:

Ms.Farhtheeba Rahat Khan is a development professional with experience backed up by private sector interventions and development sector working realities and challenges. As the lead of ‘Private Sector Health project’, Ms.Khan undertook studies to understand private sector healthcare market dynamics and simultaneously worked on the policy front with Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and its directorates in addressing the supply side issues of healthcare market. She provided technical assistance for formulation of policy framework, guidelines and accreditation systems in the health training, and emphasized on avenues for women employment in the health sector. Currently, Ms.Khan is the Team Leader for the ‘Working with Women’ project implemented by SNV where she is facilitating interventions in garment factories, following a  gender sensitive and gender-specific approach to ensure equity in healthcare service provision for female garment workers.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Healthcare costs usually stand in the way to access quality health services by the poor, especially when there is no structured govt. support to bear the financial burden. In Bangladesh 66% of the expenses are out of the pocket. The support services available even for rural poor is not available for the urban garment worker due to long and confined working hours. So who should provide the support? What modalities are feasible?  Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Health Insurance can reduce the financial burden. A new insurance scheme for garment workers was introduced; collaboration between an insurance company and a healthcare service provider was built.  The premium was set as BDT 500 per worker with an annual coverage of BDT 15,000. This was piloted in 3 factories. Findings: Workers started accessing the services under the cashless transaction modality. The highest service accessed annually by a single worker amounted to BDT 5500, and the lowest being BDT 650. This information was enough to convince the workers of the benefit received with a minimal annual premium-pay of BDT 500. In the first year, the insurance premium was paid by the donor funds, but in the second year the factories and workers are sharing BDT 200 and now buyer and brands are coming forward to support the initiative. Conclusion & Significance: The question which I raised in the problem statement is leading to the solution. A collaborative model where the main stakeholders factories and buyers join hands in ensuring healthcare, especially SRHR, in a more affordable manner for workers – because it is a cyclic effect – if the worker is healthy, she is productive and less absent from work, leading to meeting shipments and orders by factories, which in turn leads to buyer retention and at the broader level a sustained international market for Bangladeshi garment and thus better living for workers.    

Speaker
Biography:

Ruchi Girotra MD,MBA has her Expertise in Infection Prevention and infectious Diseases .She is currently President  for Specialty Certified Medical Assistant (SCMA) R and oversees the development of all study guides, exam content and other published materials for the medical assistance designation.  She has also played an active role in initiation and maintenance of Joint Commission International standards, safe healthcare practices, sterilization and disinfection, antibiotic stewardship programs in various hospitals. She has published several research papers in international and national medical journals.

Abstract:

Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Tuberculosis (TB) is a Global threat especially in Immunocompromised patients with India and China carrying the greatest estimated burden of Multi Drug Tuberculosis (MDR), Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is defined as disease caused by strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are at least resistant to treatment with Isoniazid and Rifampicin.1

WHO ‘s updated policy document continues to strongly advise that Xpert MTB/RIF be used as the initial diagnostic test in both adults and children who are at risk of MDR-TB or HIV-associated TB, and that these two groups should be prioritized for testing with Xpert MTB/RIF when resources are limited.  2 We Used Xpert MTB /RIF system in our Hospital to predict prevalence of MDR Pulmonary TB in at risk population and thereby suggest Infection Prevention measures to prevent the spread. The case Finding for Clinical tuberculosis was based  on clinical history criteria defined according to  WHO’s Guidelines for the Programmatic Management of Drug-resistant TB .3 A total of 100 sputum specimens of patients >18 years of age and suspected of MDR pulmonary TB were followed over a period of 6 months. Average age of patients was 37 years and 52 specimens tested positive for Pulmonary TB and rifampicin resistance was detected in 49% of positive cases indicating high prevalence of rifampicin resistance and thereby suggesting Multi Drug Resistance. Rifampicin resistance is a reliable proxy for MDR-TB in patient groups in many countries (4-6) .Based on the findings, the Infection Prevention department suggested the following infection prevention steps in Chest and Tuberculosis department of the Hospital in order to prevent TB exposure to staff and patients, and (ii) to reduce the spread of infection by ensuring rapid diagnosis and treatment.

1 Screening of TB Suspects or patients on TB Medications.

2. Education of Patients.

3. Separation of TB Suspects from other patients.

4. Triaging.

5. Regular Training programs.

6. Use of Respirators  (N-95) were promoted in  bronchoscopy or specialized treatment centers.

7. Implementation of Environmental measures.

This Study emphasizes the need for methods for rapid diagnosis of MDR Tuberculosis like Xpert MTB/RIF the results of which are helpful in  rapid and effective implementation of Infection prevention measures in resource limited countries to control the spread . 

Speaker
Biography:

Osman M. M. Ali is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Khartoum. He had a PhD in Limnology (Study of inland waters) from the University of London. His main academic interest is environmental studies with emphasis on water resources management and aquatic macrophytes. He has a long experience in the field of environmental impact assessment via teaching, research and consultations. He acted as team leader for over 30 EIA studies in the realm of oil development, gold mining, hydropower projects, roads and water harvesting. He enjoyed being a member of the IAIA and he is a member of the East Africa Association of Impact Assessment and the National Coordinator. He was Lead Author for the Africa Chapter on Water Policies as part of UNEP GEO-5 Report which was presented at Rio+20 in 2012. He has participated in over 50 national and international workshops and conferences.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Sudan is witnessing an increased tempo in development projects in the wake of the severance of Southern Sudan in 2011. The investment activities are mainly based on the exploitation of the country’s natural capital.  Though EIAs are mandatory conducted, the health impacts that inevitably accompany these activities are not sufficiently assessed.  The purpose of this article is to make a diagnosis of the status of health considerations in EIA studies and to propose measures to make the assessment more effective.

Methodology: EIA reports for water diversion (dams), irrigation, oil development and gold mining projects were reviewed, taking on board cases from African EIAs. Controversial issues are highlighted taking the case of Oncocerciasis.

Findings:  Health impacts are included in most EI statements but not as a chapter on itself. For hydropower projects emphasis has been on the upper stream region. TB health impacts in EIA are reviewed in the case of GERD. Health issues in EIA are becoming more pressing with the proliferation of artisanal and licensed mining. Health impacts due to the expected change in livelihoods are not investigated. The health implications of climate change, as an overarching leverage, are overlooked in EIAs.

Conclusions: Health issues in EIA in Sudan are lightly touched and no sole HIA is conducted. There is a need for health issues to be the core aspect in EIA studies.  The issue of transboundary diseases is emerging strongly with the construction of GERD.

Recommendations are made to make health assessment more effective in Sudan through, inter alia, the attention to zoonotic diseases in agricultural EIA studies, the inclusion of health monitoring near the spillways to assess black fly activity, the consideration of transboundary health aspects and the upgrading  HIA to the tier of SEA.

Speaker
Biography:

Yan Sha received her PhD in toxicology from Sun Yat-sen University at Guangzhou, China. She completed her visitor schloar fellowship in Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. Dr Sha is a researcher from Shenzhen Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Diseases, her research focused on both DNA repair and molecular mutagenesis induced by workplace chemicals .She has published about 15 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important metabolites derived from benzene, is known to be associated with acute myelogenous leukemia risk; however, its carcinogenic mechanism remains unclear. Recently, we reported that ROS participated HQ-induced cytotoxicity in TK6 cells. To explore the moleulare mechanism of cell response induced by HQ in TK6 cells.We treated TK6 cells with HQ 20μmol/L for 24h, to further identify the proteins related to HQ induced cytotoxicity by using the techniques of 2D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF–MS/MS. After HQ treatment, cells were lysed in lysis solution, then the supernatant were collected and . The total cellular proteins were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and visualized by colloidal comassie blue staining. Digital image were analyzed using ImagerMaster 2Dplatinum 5.0 software. The deferentially expressed protein spots were picked and digested in gel then identified by MALDI-TOF–MS/MS. Among the 31 differential proteins identified, 21 Down-regulated proteins identified in the TK cells induced by HQ were found to be mainly involved in cell proliferation and migration, DNA replication, tumor protein and cytoskeleton protein , including purine biosynthesis protein,Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein 1, Keratin. Meanwhile, 8 proteins involved in some oxidative and ubiquitination were up-regulated in the TK6 cells induced by HQ , including NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, HSP70 and  Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2N. And we applied western-blot to validated HSP70 and Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2N in TK6 cells treated by 0,5,10,20μmol/L HQ treated for 24h. The results showed that the protein expression level of HSP70 and Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2N were up-regulated along with the diferent concentration of HQ treatment. Our research indicated that oxidative stress, RAS pathway and ubiquitination may be involved in HQ induced acute cytotoxicity in TK6 cells. 

Speaker
Biography:

Jinky Leilanie LU holds a Master Degree of Occupational Health and PhD, and a Research Professor of the National Institutes of Health, University of the Philippines Manila with the Institute of Health Policy and Development Studies. She has authored two books, Gender, Information Technology, and Health which won the National Academy of Science and Technology book award in 2010, and reprinted by the  University of Hawaii Press, 2007, and Basics of Occupational Health and Safety: Guidebook for Practitioners and Industries. She has produced 51 journal articles, and 28 of which are Science Citation Indexed. She also contributed a chapter in the Handbook of Anthropometry Physical Measures of Human Form in Health and Disease, published by Springer in 2012. Prof. Lu is a staunch advocate, both as an engaged academic and scientist, in promoting epidemiology of occupational health and safety. 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Worldwide, small-scale mining (SSM) provides employment to about 13 million people and affects the livelihood of 80-100 million. Methods: This study investigated the ergonomic and safety hazards of small scale miners in one of the largest small scale mining area in the Philippines which is the area of Itogon, Benguet. There were 93 small scale miners who were included in the study as they complied with the inclusion criteria. The methods consisted of survey questionnaires, health physical examination guide, individual interviews, and work process observation tool. Results: The results showed that the small-scale miners worked for an average of 10.7 years, and a maximum work year of 40. The most widely employed mining technique was the  dog-hole mining consisting of several sub-processes -tunneling, ball milling and gravity concentration, cyanide leaching,  and smelting. The ergonomic and safety hazards identified were noise exposure from the dynamite blast, temperature extremes, and exposure to dust from dynamite blasting. The miners experienced prolonged crouching and bending, prolonged handling of tools, and carrying heavy sacks filled with mineral ores. There were no standard work protection and safety measures followed by the miners. They resorted to improvised protective equipment such as wearing of sleeveless shirts and drinking water for temperature extremes, distancing themselves from the mining blasts during dynamite blasting, and intermittently used carts with manual handling in the transport of ores packed in sacks. In the ball milling and gravity concentration process, machine-related accidents were noted such as experiencing cuts from the crusher. In the cyanide leaching which uses massive amounts of cyanide, the most prevalent hazards were heat, dust, and chemicals such as cyanide fumes. In the smelting process, smoke from burning ore and coal as well as exposure to borax and nitric acid fumes. Burn injuries were reported among miners. A third (31.2%) of miners have experienced accidents. The most common injury was laceration at 47.8%, followed by methane inhalation, fracture of hand digits, and contusion at 17.4%. The most prevalent health symptom reported by the miners was muscle pain which points to exposure to ergonomic hazards and risks. Conclusion & Significance It is suggested that intervention programs for ergonomics and safety measures be implemented by the local government, and health and safety nets be provided for the small scale miners in Itogon, Benguet.

 

Keywords:         Small scale mining, ergonomics, occupational health and safety, gold extraction, Philippine mining